Katie Bopp Hunt – Muscle Can Be Resilient

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“The human body is an amazing piece of machinery.”  “I don’t believe the human body was meant to be sedentary, use it or lose it.”

Katie Bopp Hunt

Activities: Gymnastics, Weightlifting, Figure Competitor, CrossFit

Q: Were you athletic growing up?

Yes. I was a competitive level 7 gymnast, I rode horses, and I even did one season of wrestling in the 8th grade!

Q: What drew you to being active?

I’ve always been active. My mother says I drove her crazy because I was always climbing on things and trying to run away from her. I love wiggling! I actually get grumpy if I don’t workout for a few days.

Q: When did you start weight training?

I took a weightlifting class as an elective in the 8th grade, and was one of only 3 girls in the class. I loved every moment of it.

Q: How has it changed your life?

It has become a huge part of my life! I make it a priority as a part of my overall health. It’s taught me discipline, as well as both delayed, and instant gratification. I believe it has affected my character and continually puts me in a positive mood.

Q:  You’re originally from Nevada, why did you move to New York?

I’ve always wanted to experience living in a big city, particularly New York. I grew up in rural northern Nevada and at age 24, decided I needed a change of scenery. I was recently single, and the company where I worked for six years went out of business; not to mention my house burned down on Friday the 13th! I just needed a fresh start and New York seemed pretty appealing!

Q:  Do you believe moving here was a good decision, if so, why?

Living in New York City has been one of the most challenging, yet rewarding things I’ve ever experienced. There have been good times and bad times, but overall I wouldn’t take back the decision to move here. I met the love of my life, my husband Kyle, and now we’re expecting our first child, a little girl in August. I guess you could say it was the best decision I’ve ever made.

Katie and Kyle first meeting at their photo shoot

Q: So you are expecting your first child, how far along are you?

As of May 8th, I am 22 weeks. My due date is August 31, 2014.

Q: Do you think resistance training has helped your pregnancy?

Absolutely! Granted I’ve lifted weights for many years now, but I believe continuing my training (modified, of course) has helped me gain an appropriate amount of weight for my pregnancy. I also feel strong, able, and mobile because I continue to do it. I’ve heard giving birth is an exhausting experience and I believe being fit for delivery will make the process much easier on my body because I’ll be more prepared.

Q:  Do you think you will continue to train throughout your entire pregnancy? If so, why?

Yes, I know as my belly gets larger I will become less able to do some exercises, but that’s the beauty of modifying your workouts to fit your needs and abilities. I do not believe the human body was meant to be sedentary, use it or lose it.

Katie expecting first child 22 months circa 2014

Q:  Have you gotten any negative feedback about continuing to train from people you know?

No, more concerns than anything, but I believe they stem from a very old-school belief system. Their concerns are more ignorance than anything. The human body is an amazing piece of machinery. I’m pregnant, not handicapped!

Q: What advice would you give other women thinking about having a baby?

Going into pregnancy healthy, fit and strong is ideal. It’s not ideal to try to start a workout routine after becoming pregnant, so get started on your health and fitness first! If you do decide to start working out after becoming pregnant, seek professional help with putting a training program together.

Q:  What’s the hardest part about being pregnant?

I’ve never been one to be left out or left behind so I have had to come to terms with not being able to have my coffee or a glass of wine. I’ve had to stop my intense physical training and tone it down. It’s the little things like appetite change, heartburn and initial fatigue. Overall though, it’s doable and one heck of a journey.